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Daniel Scott

Craig-Lee Hall (CL) 263
(401) 456-8679
(401) 456-8028
dscott@ric.edu

Academic Background

B.A. Georgia State University;
M.A., Ph.D. University of Illinois

I have degrees from Georgia State University in Atlanta and from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (M.A. and Ph.D.). At Illinois, I was not a student in the English department. I was in Comparative Literature, a field that emphasizes the intersections and correspondences (collisions and connections) amongst texts from multiple cultural and linguistic traditions. I have been a member of the faculty at RIC since 1994.

Here at RIC, my teaching has focused mainly (but not exclusively) on the course in African American literature (ENGL 326) and on the Non-Western literatures (ENGL 336). I have published novelist Charles Johnson, Nigerian dramatist Wole Soyinka, filmmaker Marlon Riggs, Harlem Renaissance figures Wallace Thurman and Zora Neale Hurston, poet Aime Cesaire and sorcerer Wilson Harris. Right now, I’m working on an oral history project based on interview with black gay men in Rhode Island.

Lately, too, I find that I’m interested in what you might call two extra-linguistic aspects of literature: movement and laughter. The first is interesting to me in terms of dance (in particular) and examining its narrative and anti-narrative possibilities. I wonder what looking at gesture and movement might contribute to understanding how we read and what becomes of our reading experiences. The second, laughter, is more about trying to celebrate comic modes of writing and reading. Of course, there is a great tradition of comedy, and there is the recent explosion in stand-up comedy as an art-form. I wonder how laughter’s subversive and curative properties feed into a neglected vein in African American literary traditions. Three people I would invite to dinner: Euripides, Roger Federer, and Audre Lorde.

Courses Taught

AFAM 200 Perspectives Afr/Afr-Amer Cultures
AFAM 410 Seminar-Comparative Race Relations
ENGL 150 Topics
ENGL 161 Western Literature
ENGL 163 Intro To Non Western Cultures
ENGL 326 Studies in Afro-American Literature
ENGL 336 Non-Western Literatures
ENGL 390 Directed Study
ENGL 523 Topics-Ethnic Am/Afr Amer Literature
ENGL 524 Topics In Postcolonial Literature
ENGL 591 Directed Reading
HONR 161 Seminar in Western Literature
HONR 163 Seminar in Non-Western Cultures

Publications

“’A Knowledge Disquieting and Liberating’: Black Gay Male Writers in Rhode Island,” Booklet accompanying Black Lavender: An Exhibit of Writings by Black Gay Men, Spring 2005 (Rhode Island Council for the Humanities).

“Stories of Freedom,” The Freedom Talks: Reflections from Rhode Island Scholars, Spring 2004 (Rhode Island Council for the Humanities).

“Strangers in the Night: Building LGBT Community,” Out on Campus, Volume 3, Number 2 (Spring 2004).

“Harlem Shadows: Reevaluating Wallace Thurman’s The Blacker the Berry,” MELUS Journal, Volume 29, Numbers 3 & 4 (Fall/ Winter 2004), 323-339.

“Zora Neale Hurston,” The Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance, edited by Cary Wintz and Paul Finkelman (Routledge, 2004).

“Harlem Renaissance—Boston Connections,” The Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance, edited by Cary Wintz and Paul Finkelman (Routledge, 2004).

Co-editor, The Collected Writings of Wallace Thurman: A Harlem Renaissance Reader (with Amritjit Singh) (Rutgers University Press, 2003).

“Rudolph Fisher: the Art of Transformation,” Langston Hughes at 100 (Booklet funded by the Rhode Island Foundation), February 2002.

“A Grassroots History of the Stonewall South” (with James E. Schlageter), Options: Rhode Island’s Lesbian and Gay Newsmagazine, Volume XXI, No. 1 (February 2002).

“Reclaiming the Past and Preparing the Future: Firmin Conference, June 1 –2 at Rhode Island College,” Voices, URI – African and African American Studies Program (September 2001).

“Outside the Box: Addressing the Complexity of Black Gay Male Identity,” Options: Rhode Island’s Lesbian and Gay Newsmagazine, Volume XX, No. 1 (February 2001).

“Interrogating Identity: Appropriation and Transformation in Charles Johnson's Middle Passage,” in I Call Myself an Artist: Writings by and about Charles Johnson, edited by Rudolph P. Byrd (Indiana University Press, 1999).

“The Challenges of Contemporary Criticism: Two Recent Studies of August Wilson,” MELUS Journal, Volume 24, Number 3 (Fall 1999), 163-168.

“Mark Doty--A Display of Mackerel,” Masterplots--Poetry Series, 1999.

“Ai--Killing Floor,” Masterplots--Poetry Series, 1999.

“Review of John Lowe’s Jump at the Sun,” MELUS, Volume 23, Number 4 (Winter 1998), 223-226.

“John Rechy," Issues and Identities in Literature, Salem Press, Pasadena, CA, 1997.

“Wilson Harris," Issues and Identities in Literature, Salem Press, Pasadena, CA, 1997.

“Fossil and Psyche,” Issues and Identities in Literature, Salem Press, Pasadena, CA, 1997.

“This Day’s Death,” Issues and Identities in Literature, Salem Press, Pasadena, CA, 1997.

“City of Night," Issues and Identities in Literature, Salem Press, Pasadena, CA, 1997.

Review of Apollos Nwauwa’s Imperialism, Academe, and Nationalism in Voices 3, 1 (Fall 1997).

“From Myth to Ritual: Jung, Soyinka, and the Modern World,” World Literature Written in English, 35, 1 (1996), 33-46.

“Interrogating Identity: Appropriation and Transformation in Charles Johnson's Middle Passage,” African American Review, 29, 4 (Winter 1995), 645-655.

"Dreaming the Other: Breton, Cesaire, and the Problematics of Influence," Romance Quarterly, 42, 1 (Winter 1995), 28-38.

Cahier d’un retour au pays natal: la poetique de la violence, “Romance Notes, 34, 2 (Winter 1993), 143-154.

“Report on MELUS 1995,” MELUS News Notes, 17, 2 (Summer 1995), 12-13.

“Robert Deane Pharr,” The Oxford Companion to African Literature, ed. William Andrews, et al. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

“Gerard Barrax,” The Oxford Companion to African American Literature, ed. William Andrews, et al. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

“Walter Mosley,” The African American Encyclopedia, Supplement. New York: Marshall Cavendish, 1996.

“Marlon Riggs,” The African Encyclopedia, Supplement. New York: Marshall Cavendish, 1996.

To Dream a New World: Surrealism, Myth, and “Race” in the Works of Aime Cesaire, Alejo Carpentier, and Wilson Harris (dissertation).

Page last updated: April 13, 2015